Wear Green; Don’t Get Pinched!

Happy Belated St. Patrick’s Day! I hope everyone had a safe and fun celebration despite us still being in a pandemic. The pandemic in Hawai’i is improving. Bars recently have gotten the green light to reopen again. Of course, with precautions and abiding by CDC guidelines. We have a few Irish pubs in the downtown/Chinatown area that were happy to open in time for St. Patty’s Day.

It’s tradition in my family to eat fresh corned beef and cabbage (see featured image), plus carrots and potatoes during the week of St. Patty’s Day. Yum! My dad makes the best Irish meal. I always look forward to eating this. It’s so delicious! I love drizzling mustard all over my dish. Perfecto!

In an article I read on Martha Stewart’s website, the Irish actually eat bacon (aka ham) and cabbage (Vaughn, 2020). Corned beef became a popular ingredient to this staple dish because it was cheaper than bacon back in the late 19th and early 20th centuries when the Irish came to America (Vaughn, 2020). Very logical. Well, I’d take fresh corned beef over ham. I’m not so much of a ham and pork person.

I wear green on March 17th to avoid getting pinched. I also have shamrock earrings and a necklace that I’m always excited to sport during this time of year. It’s said that leprechauns are a reason why people wear green on St. Patty’s (Davidson, n.d.). The tradition says wearing green makes you undetectable to the leprechauns, as they like to pinch anyone they can see (Davidson, n.d.). Those rascals! Some people believe the color green will bring good luck, while others wear it pay tribute to their Irish heritage (Davidson, n.d.).

Happy Spring! May this season blossom with new beginnings, new goals, new dreams, and new life.

Bloom where you’re planted,

FS x

References:

Davidson, R. (n.d.). St. Patrick’s day. https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/celebrations/article/st-patricks-day

Vaughn, K. (2020). How corned beef and cabbage became a St. Patrick’s day staple. https://www.marthastewart.com/7690010/corned-beef-cabbage-st-patricks-day-history

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